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Harvard Conservation Trust Annual Meeting

Guest Speaker Lindsay Randall, Expert on Local Indigenous Peoples

Harvard, MA and the broader Nashoba Valley have a deep and rich indigenous history that spans over 15,000 years to the present day.  HCT is pleased to announce that Lindsay Randall, Curator of Education and Outreach at the Robert S. Peabody Institute of Archaeology at Phillips Academy, is the keynote speaker for the Harvard Conservation Trust’s annual meeting this November.  A passionate archaeologist and educator, Lindsay uses material objects to bring historic cultures to life. She will explore the fascinating history of Native Americans in and around Harvard, focusing on how the geographical landscape shaped their way of life. Throughout the evening, the audience will have an opportunity to examine real and reproduction artifacts.

We will also highlight the success of the HCT-Bromfield Community Service Collaboration, featuring the great work of the Bromfield stewards-in-training for Harvard’s trails.

This is an in-person event for HCT members and parents of Bromfield students only. Please register using the link below.  We ask that attendees be vaccinated and require everyone to wear a mask.  Not a member yet and want to attend? Visit harvardconservationtrust.org/join.

Date and Time: Wednesday, November 17, at 7 pm
Place: Harvard Historical Society, 215 Still River Road, Harvard, MA

Please register at bit.ly/HCTannualmeeting by November 15th.

 

Annual Meeting: Tuesday, November 19th, 7:00 to 9:00 PM.

 
Come join us at HCT’s Annual Meeting, held on Tuesday, November 19th, at Volunteer Hall in the Harvard Public Library (4 Pond Road), 7:00 to 9:00 PM.
 

 
This year’s guest speaker will be Richard Higgins, author of Thoreau and the Language of Trees. Richard Higgins is a writer, editor, photographer and lecturer in Concord, Massachusetts. He was a staff reporter and editor for The Boston Globe for 20 years, and his writing has appeared in The New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, Christian Century, Esquire, and Smithsonian and many other publications. In this presentation drawn from the book, he explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees through Thoreau’s words, photos of historic trees and his own images of trees today. Mr. Higgins will show how trees inspired Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, work as a naturalist, philosophical thought and spiritual life, and explain why Thoreau’s love of trees and wisdom about them speaks to us today.
 
The presentation will be followed by light refreshments, including homemade gingerbread, fresh apple cider, and good cheer. Bring a friend!